Carbon Monoxide Detector

Find Information about Carbon Monoxide Detectors and Smoke Detectors.

Testing Carbon Monoxide Detector

Important Safety Information About Hydrogen Sulfide H2S

By George Murphys on April 16, 2014

Hydrogen sulfide has a signature smell of "rotten egg" and is known by several different names including swamp gas, manure gas, stink damp and sewer gas. It is a very hazardous gas that is colorless and flammable.

There are several industrial applications and activities that produce hydrogen sulfide such as the drilling and refinement of crude petroleum, wastewater treatment, tanneries, coke ovens, and paper mills. Essentially, hydrogen sulfide occurs when bacteria breaks down organic matter such as human or animal waste.

The Dangers of Hydrogen Sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide is a chemical asphyxiant which means that even low concentrations of this gas affect the body's ability to maintain an adequate oxygen supply because the oxygen cannot be transferred to the cells. Carbon monoxide is another example of a chemical asphyxiant.

Even though hydrogen sulfide has a distinctive smell of "rotten egg, " workers that are consistently exposed to the gas they will lose the ability to smell the gas even though it is present. This loss of smell can happen very quickly or even instantaneously which makes working in an environment where there is a possibility of consistent exposure to hydrogen sulfide very dangerous.

Hydrogen sulfide is also a highly flammable gas. When the gas mixeswith air it can cause an explosion. The gas may also travel towards a source of ignition and cause flashback. When the gas is ignited it burns and produces toxic vapors like sulfur dioxide. Lastly, direct exposure with liquid hydrogen can cause severe frostbite.

Health Effects of H2S

In low concentrations exposure to hydrogen sulfide can irritate the eyes, nose, throat and respiratory system. A person exposed to the gas may experience shortness of breath, coughing, and tearing. Long term exposure can also cause headaches, fatigue, digestive problems, insomnia, irritability and weight loss.

In moderate concentrations hydrogen sulfide can cause more serious irritation to the eyes and respiratory system as well as nausea, vomiting and fluid accumulation in the lungs.

High concentrations of hydrogen sulfide can cause unconsciousness, shock, convulsions, stopped breathing and death. At high levels it can take as little as a single breath to cause death. Therefore, it is imperative that anyone working in an industry, or environment where hydrogen sulfide is present should be properly trained and educated about the dangers of the gas and safety protocolsfor working with and performing rescues in environments where one is exposed to hydrogen sulfide.

Working In Environments Where Hydrogen Sulfide Is Present

Environments where hydrogen sulfide is present require special safety measures. The air must be tested for the presence and concentration of hydrogen sulfide by a qualified person. The air should be tested using air monitoring equipment including hydrogen sulfide detector tubes or a multi gas meter able to detect the gas. Testing should always include an assessment of fire and explosion probability so that the appropriate safety precautions can be put in place.

If hydrogen sulfide gas is detected through testing, the entire area must be constantly ventilated to remove the gas. Ifthe gas cannot be fully removed then anyone entering the area must use respiratory protective equipment, rescue, communication and any other personal protective equipment deemed necessary.

Hydrogen sulfide at a level of 100 ppm is an immediate danger to both life and health. Therefore entry into an area identified as an immediate danger to life and health (IDLH) can only be done using full self-contained breathing apparatus with a minimum service life of 30 minutes, or another approved respirator with an auxiliary self-contained air supply.

For areas with a hydrogen sulfide level less than 100 ppm an air-purifying respirator can be used as long as the filter cartridge is approved for hydrogen sulfide purification.

George Murphy is the writer of this article who works in a chemical factory in Canada. He has recently completed a number of fast aid and safety courses. After completing these trainings, he has become more aware of the danger of Hydrogen Sulfide gas. Sometimes he visits different websites like Thesafetygroup.ca that provides safety trainings on Hydrogen Sulfide caution and many fast aid treatments which is really helpful for everyone who deals with H2S gas.

Original article published on SooperArticles.com

Next page: Kidde Carbon Monoxide Detector Beeping Nighthawk


Bookmark/Share This Page:

ADD TO DEL.ICIO.US ADD TO DIGG ADD TO FURL ADD TO NEWSVINE ADD TO NETSCAPE ADD TO REDDIT ADD TO STUMBLEUPON ADD TO TECHNORATI FAVORITES ADD TO SQUIDOO ADD TO WINDOWS LIVE ADD TO YAHOO MYWEB ADD TO ASK ADD TO GOOGLE ADD TO MAGNOLIA ADD TO NING ADD TO RAWSUGAR ADD TO SPURL ADD TO TAGTOOGA

  Bookmark and Share

Recommended Products

Get The Debt Help You Need

Smart Home Up to 60% OFF